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By By the Rev. William J. Davis.

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In words such as çaúr “head”, Samaritan tradition splits the syllable into two: rè"o“, while in HDSS the spelling çawr probably indicates the stage prior to the split—that is, one long syllable, presumably with two peaks: something like *ròo“. Thus, we see that processes which only begin to be seen in HDSS are completed in SH; this fact indicates that the latter language is relatively young. In other words, all of the above differences were brought about by time. 8. SH and MH—the chronological factor The principle of time is reiterated in Ben-Óayyim’s statement at the end of his grammar, which summarizes the differences between SH and MH: Since we have no knowledge whatsoever about local differences in the Hebrew language either in the First or Second Temple periods, with the exception of rare hints such as the interchange s/ç in the Ephraimite tongue (and even then this is given different explanations) or the complete loss of the diphthongs aw and ay in the north of Palestine, we have no way of knowing what was preserved in the Samaritan tradition from the language that was commonly spoken in the hill country of Ephraim, the spiritual and residential center of the Samaritans.

I would not make use of reconstructed processes in order to sub- 24 This is the rule but it does not imply that SH always has a later appearance, while MH has an ancient appearance (see n. 8 at p. 3, as well as below). 2. 26 This is the accepted assumption; E. e. a multiplicity of penultimate-stressed syllables, and he also argues that the penultimate forms are intensified in Samaritan tradition, while the ultimate forms are intensified in Tiberian tradition; see E. Qimron, “Studies in the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls” (in Hebrew), Hebrew Linguistics 33–35 (1992), pp.

Introduction 15 c. In words such as çaúr “head”, Samaritan tradition splits the syllable into two: rè"o“, while in HDSS the spelling çawr probably indicates the stage prior to the split—that is, one long syllable, presumably with two peaks: something like *ròo“. Thus, we see that processes which only begin to be seen in HDSS are completed in SH; this fact indicates that the latter language is relatively young. In other words, all of the above differences were brought about by time. 8. SH and MH—the chronological factor The principle of time is reiterated in Ben-Óayyim’s statement at the end of his grammar, which summarizes the differences between SH and MH: Since we have no knowledge whatsoever about local differences in the Hebrew language either in the First or Second Temple periods, with the exception of rare hints such as the interchange s/ç in the Ephraimite tongue (and even then this is given different explanations) or the complete loss of the diphthongs aw and ay in the north of Palestine, we have no way of knowing what was preserved in the Samaritan tradition from the language that was commonly spoken in the hill country of Ephraim, the spiritual and residential center of the Samaritans.

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